The journey of a book starts even before it is written. No matter how touching the story is or how real the characters are. No one will pick the book off the shelf unless you (the author) speaks about its conception.

That’s right. Promoting your book is equally important as publishing/printing it. Narrate the conceptual journey of the story that you are going to publish. Just as an expecting mother keeps everything ready for her baby, you as the author also need to get ready and enthusiastic readers for your book. All you need to do is start it early! Tell your friends, colleagues, neighbors about the book- the idea behind it, your experience writing it, how it will interest them. This way the book will generate popularity through word of mouth. Your friends might recommend the book to their friends and so on. You already have curious readers awaiting your book’s release.

Next step is to keep their curiosity building up. Start a blog or a page on Social media network, wherein you keep the readers updated about the book’s publishing process. Or better still, post a sample chapter of the book just few days before the release of the book so that the story remains fresh in the readers mind. Do not give out every detail of the book or the characters; this will make the readers lose interest. Get people share their similar experiences, their stories might actually provide you with the matter for your next book!

Pay special attention to the book cover. Let it reveal the concept of the book without revealing the story. Get genuine reviews about the book printed on the cover, paid reviews will not only appear superficial but will also set a high expectation from the readers which in some cases your book might not be able to live up to. Instead of selling your book to a large number of people, set a target audience based on the contents of the story. Generating readership among selected section of people will be easier than targeting those people who might not be able to relate to the story.

Always have a positive attitude when promoting your book. No one knows the story better than you do, not even the publisher. The way to become a best-selling author is just a few talks away!

by Frederick Noronha, Publisher, Goa,1556

Goa — which teetered on the brink of collapse in the tumultuous seventeenth century — actually became a thriving cultural, religious and diplomatic hub in the eighteenth century, says a new book on the subject.

‘Globalising Goa (1660-1820)’ by historian Ernestine Carreira of the Universite d’Aix-Marseille in France, says Goa built “close relations with the foremost continental empires of the day — Mughal, Maratha and Mysore”.

9789380739601The 622-page title — just published by Goa,1556 — looks at the role Goa occupied both in India and the world beyond, before the advent of the British Raj.

“The globalisation of trade in the eighteenth century restored its former Atlantic ties via Brazil and the development of the African slave trade,” says Carreira.

She notes that the doors for Goa to the Orient also opened via China and the opium markets. But “within a century, however, it was but a modest outpost of bustling Bombay”.

Carreira argues that Goa is today being “rediscovered by the West”. In the early Modern Era too, it “appealed hugely to the European popular imagination” as a far-flung capital where two worlds and cultures overlapped”.

But after falling “into oblivion” for two centuries, such narratives are now being reassessed as “inventive forms in a Western literary tradition which yearned to relive exotic history by proxy or to understand the expansionist appetites of the past”.

In four parts, the book seeks to locate Goa “inside and outside” Portuguese imperial dynamics; study Luso-French networking and connections between Goa and Pondicherry in the eighteenth century; review the role of Goa in global trade; and understand the role of Goa in travel journals.

Among other topics, the hard-bound book, priced at Rs 500 in Goa, looks at the currencies that were relevant to Goa in the past. It studies the “shifting boundaries” of the area governed by Goa.

In one chapter titled “An Empire for Sale”, it explains French and British companies’ strategic bids to take over the Estado do India ports between 1661 and 1813.

The book, published by Goa, 1556, is available for sale on dogearsetc.com.

“The Fama of Menino Jesus of Colvá. Faith and Festivity across History”, a book by José Venâncio Machado, was launched at a function at the District Library in Navelim, Goa, on 12 October 2013.

DSCN2100The book was launched at the hands of Justice Eurico Santana Da Silva, Former Judge of High Court of Bombay, and was presented by Rev. Fr. Nascimento Mascarenhas, Goan historian and the author. Respectively, they represented the Court of Justice, the Catholic Church and the Community of Colvá, Goa – the three main players in the history of the two statuettes of Menino Jesus of Colvá, venerated each year during the Fama.

DSCN2115In his address, Justice Eurico Santana da Silva commended the research conducted by the author and remarked that an important event in the history of Colvá was documented through this effort. Similarly, Fr. Nascimento Mascarenhas underlined the importance of the awareness of histories such as these and congratulated the author for his valuable research, inspite of not being a historian by profession or having had prior experience of research of this quality.

The author, José Venâncio Machado, later presented a history of the Menino Jesus statuettes, depicting with the help of archival material how the original statuette, now in Rachol, reached there and how a replica of the image has since been venerated in Colvá.

Dr Teotónio R. de Souza, former Director of the Xavier Centre for Historical Research, Porvorim, has written the Foreword for this book.

The audio recording of the proceedings during the launch can be heard here: